Here Now, Gone the Next Day - New York Yankees Manager 1978, 1981-82

by admin ~ June 22nd, 2009

 

If you ask me, his time with the Yankees is actually on and off, other than the fact that it is also short-lived. Bob Lemon was the New York Yankees Manager in 1978 and 1981-82.

His breakthrough with professional baseball is actually three: a right-handed pitcher, a left-handed batting third baseman, and lastly, a manager. I wouldn’t call it successful. Though some views his accomplishment a success, but I disagree.

Just look at the fact that he improved the White Sox’ record by 26 games and won his Manager of the Year Award. But what happened next? He was fired right after his record of 34-40 on the first half. Now, his time with the Yankees as a manager; his first year was not that bad. Not until the first part of 1979, he was fired by the owner (to NO surprise of course!) because of the reality that the New York Yankees struggled (though he made an excuse regarding this incident; that he suffered a major loss because of his sons death around this time, thus he wasn’t himself).

As a player however, Bob Lemon was a “so-so.” His MLB debut was in 1941 with the Cleveland Indians. He was with the same team for 17 years, right before he became a manager.

Lemon had a drinking problem, yet, he exudes with an easy-going character. What’s great about his relationship with the owner was startling. He remained in the Yankees payroll as a scout, sort-of a lifetime contract he had with owner George Steinbrenner for the 1978 World Championship.

Robert Granville Lemon was born on September 22, 1920. With an ailing heart, Bob Lemon eventually suffered a heart attack which caused him his death.


Where is “Sweet Lou” now - New York Yankees Manager 1974-84

by admin ~ June 22nd, 2009

 

Finally the search for the best Manager of the Yankees is over, well for me that is! I have been going over the past managers handling the Yankees and I almost lost my interest to really really read so many write-ups about them because usually there is not much to read or better yet, some I just don’t find interesting.

Louis Victor Piniella or commonly known as “Sweet Lou” is ranked 14th in all-time list of Managerial wins. This nicknamed was derived from his bat swings and of course his character as well. It is wonderful that his attitude towards the team, as a player and as a manager is simply wonderful that this nickname suits him best. Born on August 28, 1943, in Tampa, Florida, he grew up playing baseball as a child.

Lou Piniella’s managerial career with the New York Yankees started from 1974 to 1984. Everybody is well aware of the pressures placed on you when you’re handling a team and know wonder Piniella went this far as 10 years to be with the Yankees knowing George Steinbrenner’s sky-scraping expectation on his managers. Plus, the fact that he is difficult to please.

Although he is also know for his aggressiveness and being on the field quick-tempered as a manager, he was actually ejected 61 times in his managerial career, in line with Joe Torre, Tony Larussa Bobby Cox who has even received more ejections than him.

His accomplishment as the New York Yankees manager throughout his 10 years tenure is quite great, having an average of 0.5 winning percentage (224-193).

During his early years as a professional baseball player, he joined MLB at age 21 with the Baltimore Orioles. He had an 11 years experience with the Yankees team where the team won 5 AL East titles (1976-78, 1980 and 1981), 4 AL Pennants (1976-78 and 1981), and two World Series Championships in 1977-78. Evidently, his experience in MLB is really great. If anything can be learned from being a true pro, it all depends on experience on both area – being a player and a manager. It has been said that when Piniella came in as the New York Yankees manager, philosophy change when he succeeded Billy Martin.

At present, Lou Piniella is managing the Cubs.


Profanity King - George Dallas Green 1989

by admin ~ June 21st, 2009

 

George Dallas Green was a pitcher in his professional baseball career; possibly, one of the shortest term to manage the New York Yankees. He was with the team in 1989.

For most of us, profanity is probably just part of our everyday lives. But for Dallas Green, it was a day-to-day experience. He proudly accepted that he is a screamer, a yeller and a cusser put altogether. And to prove his notorious character, he wounded a player’s career (I’m talking about Scott Rolen in 2001) because of a comment he said. Rolen was has been elected to the All-Start 4 times, but Green’s comment of him being an under achiever even if he can do more because of his personality.

His accomplishment with the Yankees as Manager was not that great earning under .500 at 56-65. To add more injury to the dire situation, the Yankees were 9 games over .500 the previous year, but they fell to 9 games under .500, during Dallas Green’s term. And of course, having a temper himself didn’t improve the relationship between the Yankee owner George Steinbrenner who is a go-getter with an attitude.

His personal life was uneventful. He was born on August 4, 1934 in Newport, Delaware. He bats left and throws with his right. As a baseball player, his first coming out was in June 18, 1960 for the Philadelphia Phillies and his last MLB appearance was in September 12, 1967.

Compared to the past New York Yankees manager, his career statistics are not that impressive with a Record of 20-22, ERA of 4.26 and 268 Strikeouts. One of his greatest career highlights was bringing the Phillies to their first World Series victory in 1980.

 



Don’t Want To Be a Jackass - New York Yankees Manager

by admin ~ June 21st, 2009

 

Martin was known for spinning a losing team to the winning ground. He was also identified with arguing among umpires, not to mention a widely noticeable spoof where he kicks dust on their feet. Billy Martin was born on May 16, 1928.

Perhaps unintentionally done, Martin was also known not to get along with old players and owners. Young pitchers were also overworked, and eventually burnt out. A sad vice of his was the manager’s unavoidable problem with drinking and ultimately became the cause of his death.

Alred Manuel “Billy” Martin Jr. (his birth name) was a second baseman being a professional baseball player and a New York Yankees manager from 1975 to 1979. Worked together with Billy Virdon as a manager in 1976, and then with Dick Howser and Bob Lemon in 78, consequently with Bob Lemon alone in 1978. He was visible again as a New York Yankees manager in 1983, 1985 and 1988.

His nickname Billy actually came about because her mom disliked her Dad so much that, she didn’t call him with his first name, instead, calls him “bello” which means beautiful in Italian. His interesting story growing up was, he didn’t know his real name until he reach his first day of high school. And her moms explanation why it happened? She just didn’t want him named after a  “jackass.” Totally hilarious!

Anyway, for the best part of his career in professional baseball, he was selected in All-Star 1956. In addition to that, he had 5x World Series Championship in 1951-53 and ’56. He also received a Babe Ruth award in 1953 and holds New York Yankees Number one retired.

 


Catcher Jose Molina

by admin ~ June 15th, 2009

 

Recently, I started looking into the Yankee catchers and see which one is popular with the fans and which one is earning more than the other. A player finally did caught my eye.

Jose Benjamin Molina Matta is one of the four (4) New York Yankees catcher this 2009. His earning salary is $2.125M as of 2009. Even though, his paycheck is not as high as the other Yankee catchers, like Jorge Posada.

 Jose Molina and 2 of his brothers’ Benjie and Yadier Molina are all in the MLB. They are the only three brothers in MLB history to all win World Series Championship rings.

He signed a 2-year contract with the New York Yankees in September 21, 2008. He was known for hitting the last home run in the original Yankee stadium in the Yankees final game at the ballpark against the Baltimore Orioles.

Molina throws and bats with his right hand. His experience in baseball is quite a handful of 9 years. As of May 2009, Jose Molina has a batting average of .238, 20 HRs, 121 runs batted in, and .618 on-base plus slugging.

In some testimonials on one of the popular websites that I have encountered, a lot of fans are actually doting for him. In fact, some thinks he is the best player of the New York Yankees (and Yes I agree we can be biased when we root for our favorite players) looking for him and wanting him to be back on the field; his been on disabled list since May 10th when he strained his quadriceps (a group of muscles on the backside of the thigh).

The catcher’s rehabilitation has taken longer than expected. Molina is expected to be the No. 2 catcher before end of June 2009 if he continues to progress.


When did the New York Yankees started playing baseball?

by admin ~ June 11th, 2009

 

I simply love the Yankees and everything about them, that is why I always take the time to know what is and what’s not about the team. Just because, I’d love to share this to everyone who adores them like I do.

What’s not to love? They are simply the best, the best team, the best players and the best uniform as well. Blue is calm, calm and then wild when they hit it big and make the fans go crazy.

I don’t know why this should thrill me so, but it does. I think, just the way it is when you root for a team.  I recently bought a Yankees cap and I wear it all the time – which can be very nice. People would just acknowledge you and you get “HI’s” and “HELLO’s” because they are a Yankee fan too!

Anyhow, another trivia question! When did the New York Yankees started playing baseball? The team actually started in 1901. So people, its 1901! Ok, for those who are wondering why they were called the

 Although they played as the “Baltimore Orioles” in 1901 and 1902 under the management of John McGraw and then later became the “New York Highlanders” from 1903 to 1912. They weren’t officially the “New York Yankees” until 1913.

Oh, and another fact, for those who are wondering why they were called the “Orioles” then, it was because the plans for putting up a New York team was blocked by the National League’s New York Giant who had enough political power before to keep them out. That is why, the  next best thing was to put it up in Baltimore, Maryland.

So add that up to your New York Yankees “need-to-know” trivia’s!


New York Yankee Managers - Through the Years

by stephanie ~ June 6th, 2009

From 1913 - 2009, the Yankee’s has been in 47 play-off appearances. Past managers who handled the team started with John Mc Graw when they still played as “Baltimore Orioles” in 1901 and 1902.

Clark Griffith directed the Yankee’s from 1903 to 1908, partnered with Kid Elbeld in 1908. During this time, Clark Griffith was termed as the “old Fox.” He was a Major League Baseball pitcher and a team owner. Now, in 1909 and 1910, George Stallings managed the team with Hal Chase in 1910. Around this time, they played as the New York Highlanders. It is very interesting and that Stallings was with the team for only 2 years. He died of a heart disease and when his doctor inquired why he had a bad heart — he answered him in a joking manner that it was “those damn bases on balls.”

Short years for New York Yankee managers were from 1911-1914 because they changed every year from Hal Chase alone in 1911, Harry Wolverton in 1912, Frank Chance in 1913 and partner Roger Pekinpaugh in 1914. Bill Donovan managed the team starting from 1915 to 1917, 3 straight short years and was taken over by Miller Huggins, who was with the team until 1929. He was partnered with Art Fletcher during the last year of his reign. He was nicknamed “Mighty Mite.” He won 6 American League Pennants and 3 World Series Championships. He died of an eye problem at age 50 and was in Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964,

Another manager who guided the New York Yankees for 16 long years, together with Bill Dickey and Jonny Neun in his last year at 1946 was Joe McCarthy, nicknamed “Marse Joe.” Bucky Harris, however, was with the Yankees for only 2 years in 1947 and 1948, followed by Casey Stengel who held the team until 1960.

Best known as the successor of Stengel, Ralph Houk supervised the Yankees from 1961 to 1973. Unlike other managers who were short-lived, he was with the team for 10 years. It was only in the year 1965 that the team was guided by Jonny Keane and then both of them in 1966.

In years that followed, Billy Virdon, Billy Martin, Dick Howser, Bob Lemon, Gene Michael, Clyde King, Yogi Berra, and Lou Piniella, managed the New York Yankees team from 1974 until 1988.

After 1988, Dallas Green, Bucky Dent, Stump Merril, all lead the Yankees. Their term however was very short compared to the other managers who spent as much as 10 years. At least Buck Showalter spent his time managing the team from 1992 to 1995, a little longer than most.

Recently, in the late 90’s, Joe Torre joined the team as the manager from 1996 to 2007. Amazing, as he spent a lot of years with the team.

The New York Yankees is now managed by Joe Girardi since 2008. Fans are definitely expecting more from him to lead them to victory!



10 Facts About the New York Yankees

by stephanie ~ June 6th, 2009

 

Ok, so there must be a whole lot of New York Yankee’s fan out there! Here are a few known facts about the team.

1. They are managed by Joe Torre since 1996. Joseph Paul Torre (that’s his real name, by the way) now ranks 6th in all-time MLB managerial wins. Now one huge credit for the manager is that, he has won them 10 AL East Division titles, 6 AL Pennants and 4 World Series title! Wohoooohhh! Way to go Joe!

2. The team is owned by George Steinbrenner, a very successful businessman who also purchased YES cable network.

3. They have 15 numbers retired, the most in the Major League Baseball.

4. The Yankees made it through the playoffs in 12 straight years.

5. They are in the AL East Division.

6. They have won the AL East for 9 straight years.

7. The team has won 26 World Series titles. Hey! That’s more championships than any other team in any North American sport! That alone is a great accomplishment for the Yankees they can be proud of! (My tongue is out, for those who hate the New York Yankees).

8. They play at the Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York, but they are building a new stadium this will be ready in 2009.

9. There is a one and only player remaining in MLB, who is allowed to wear number 42 ever again — Mariano Rivera!

10. From 1913-2009, the team won 26 World Championships, 39 Pennants, and 47 Playoff appearances!

That’s it folks! Hope that was very informative for those of you who needs a little dose of the New York Yankees history! And of course, for those readers who does not like to read tons and tons of words in a page! Don’t you just hate it?


What Baseball Scouts Look for in Potential Baseball Stars

by admin ~ May 15th, 2009

Our topic today is a special guide for potential baseball stars who want to play baseball not just as a hobby, but also as a full-time profession.

As the saying goes, “Nothing is Impossible,” there is absolutely nothing that’s keeping your from being the baseball star you hope to be. All it takes is a little more guts and confidence in oneself, topped with hard work, and soon enough, you’ll be in the New Yankee Stadium not as an onlooker, but as the main attraction of the game.

Below are tips on how you can impress baseball scouts in professional baseball as well as in college. As you continue to build the athlete in you, you will also be winning experience and expertise along the way. Who knows? You could be the next Babe Ruth baseball history has been waiting for.

  1. Scouts measure your attitude, how you treat your team mates, and your love for the game. Let’s start off with the obvious truth. Before scouts measure your baseball prowess, they would definitely want to know if you’re the man your skills describe you to be. A good pitcher with a very bad temper on court would end up getting more fouls than points. You will be working in a team and not solo; hence, if you don’t know how to respect your team mates, even your coach would not want to deal with you. Your attitude towards other people and to the game counts a lot; that said, the first thing that wins the hearts of scouts is your respect for the game and for fellow players.
  2. Let’s move on to your proficiency. Scouts look at your speed. Baseball, in layman’s terms, is game that involves throwing, catching, pitching, and running. See? Great speed equates to a good player who is capable of catching, running, and pitching quickly. If you’re speedy, scouts will have their eye on you.
  3. Scouts have their own manner of measuring a player’s running speed; however, those who are able to make a 60 yard dash at 6-6.5 seconds are in excellent form. Those who make it to 7 seconds or less are acceptable also.
  4. After their speed, they will have to consider the way you pitch, throw, or the way you serve your purpose in the team. Generally, they will have to see if you are a good player.
  5. Your physical strengths will also have to matter in baseball. For one, you must be tall, preferable someone within the range of 5’10 to 6’2. A ballplayer’s recommended height is 6’0 for a ballplayer; 6’1 for a pitcher; and for a pitcher, 5’11 is a desirable height. Also, someone between the weights of 190-200 pounds is a good pick.
  6. Base stealing is also an important feat in baseball and at times, you will have to make base stealing attempts. Those who can make it to a 3.0-3.2 second time frame when attempting to steal bases is in fine shape.
  7. Scouts also consider the following aspects:
  • Respect for the game and for fellow players
  • School and work habits
  • Aggressiveness
  • Maturity
  • Composure
  • Habits towards people when not playing
  • Desire to win
  • Dedication
  • Speed
  • Endurance
  • And of course, intelligence.

There are other things scouts look for in a player before picking him to be a member of a reputable college baseball team or a professional team. What are these criteria? Only scouts know them; but you, as a player, you only need to know passion for the game and you’re good to go.



Babe Ruth: The Roaring Bambino

by admin ~ April 23rd, 2009


Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig

Before he was a pitcher, long before he entered the record books, long before he made 54 homeruns as a Yankee, and long before we turned him into a chocolate bar, he was just Babe Ruth- ex-Red Sox outfielder.

Babe Ruth, born George Herman Ruth, Jr., also known as “the Sultan of Swat” and “The Bambino” was a top American Major League baseball player, famously known for playing for the Yankees as an outfielder and breaking record after record in his time. Being the first ever player to hit 60 home runs in a single season (1927), Ruth became a baseball superstar overnight and a larger than life sports icon throughout history.

Babe Ruth first played for the Baltimore Orioles; however, as the fame of free agency grew, he was sold to the Boston Red Sox until he was eventually bought by the New York Yankees in the 1920’s. His transfer was the Yankees’ greatest bane and the Red Sox’s worst boon since little did the latter know they would not be winning a single championship for the next 86 years.

Now with the Yankees, he made 54 home runs and batted .376 on his first year with his new team. The next year, he, along with his team mates made Yankee-history by winning their first ever league championship. Ruth’s display of continuous home runs and amazing records transformed the face of baseball from being the “inside game” to the “power game” from then on.

The Yankees eventually moved onto the World Series in 1921 and with Ruth in their lineup, they were able to win the first two games; however, things turned badly for Ruth and his team when he fell into a series of mishaps. Although they lost the 1921 World Series, Ruth still managed to redesign history in 1923.

1923 was a great year for the Yankees due to the construction of the Yankee Stadium, which was also named, “The House That Ruth Built.” Ruth once again gave the Yankees another victory by leading them to the championships on their first game in the stadium. Also, on the same year, they battled the New York Giants once again for the World Series, and this time, Ruth did not let victory run past him. Ruth walked eight times, batted .368, gained 8 runs, slugged 1.000, and scored 3 home runs. Eventually, they won their first World Series by 4 to 2 games.

Babe reached the height of his career in 1927 when he made a record of 60 homeruns in a season of 154 games, and became the first person to do so.

The next few years proved difficult for the Yankees as well as for Ruth. In 1929, the Yankees were unable to return to the World Series and it would take them another three years to regain their momentum. However, he was still able to win various games with the Yankees and make records.

Babe Ruth in action

As soon as Babe Ruth first entered the diamonds in 1921, he has built a lot of amazing records, some of which are still intact today. His prowess has made him baseball’s Greatest Player Ever in 1969, and in 1998, he ranked Number 1 on The Sporting News’ “Baseball’s 100 Greatest Players.”

Baseball aficionados, kids, teenagers, and adults, male or female, still look up to the man who reinvented the face of baseball. Indeed, baseball would not be as grand as we regard it to be had not Babe Ruth entered the fields. Hence, hats off to the Greatest Baseball Player of all time: Babe Ruth!

Photo credits: Regatta Le Blanc; Artifishall